Living in a Driverless Economy

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Transport as a service we’ll take the world by storm over the next few years, simply because it will enable anybody to travel efficiently and safely in any City initially and to any destination eventually for a cost that is significantly less than any current alternatives including only ones own vehicle.




 This will have a massive impact on economies, as it will remove a vast amount of cost out of the economy and put it back in the pockets of the citizens, but it will also remove a significant number of jobs from the workforce. Any worker in the transport industry or internal combustion engine related repair and maintenance industry can be expected to being extremely disrupted, simply because drivers will not be required, and because the electric vehicles that will be dominating the roads require only a fraction of a maintenance of an internal combustion engine vehicle.

 Countries and economies will have to find a way quickly to deal with any outfall from this massive  disruption to the workforce, but on the other hand countries and economies will see a massive improvement due to the  the immediate big drop in the cost of Transport. Expert analysis shows clearly that the benefit will clearly outweigh any disadvantage by nearly an order of magnitude, and it can be assumed that transport as a service is inevitable and will happen very quickly.



There will be a transition period when autonomous cars share the roads with human driven vehicles, but this period  will last a shorter time than most people think. The reason for this who’s that the autonomous taxi business will be initially incredibly profitable, simply because the competition is so expensive by necessity. The first provider of autonomous taxi services in any market will dominate very quickly, and will become very cash rich in a very short period of time which they will be able to leverage disc expand quickly into other markets. This race is basically life and death for those in the competition, and the first to market, if they manufacture their own vehicles, will have unbounded cash reserves to expand and multiply their manufacturing capability exponentially.

 The first mover advantage in this market  is so enormous that once investors wake up to the opportunity they will make as much cash available as is necessary 4 the first to market provider to get established and scale up. For consumers this simply means that services will still up at an unbelievable rate, and it is quite conceivable that in New Zealand for example who Services could expand to cover all the major centres with them 12 to 18 months.